Wednesday, 14.07.2021 - 16.00pm - 17.30pm (GVA time), Online

Women’s Participation in the Renewable Energy Transition- Policy Dialogue, Sharing Knowledge and Mutual Learning Event

Organised by the Global Initiative for Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (GI-ESCR), OXFAM Mexico and with the support of the FES Geneva office, this event took place around the 47th session of the Human Rights Council convening a group of UN expert members of human rights bodies and mechanisms and civil society organizations working in the fields of energy, climate change, and women’s rights.

Photo: Photocase_Birdys

This aspired to build a space for civil society organizations to share their experiences on the ground and foster mutual learning on gender-just energy transitions. Furthermore, it aimed to strengthen the links between experts and activists and other practitioners to promote network building and informed policy development aiming to achieve gender equitable outcomes in energy interventions. Moving beyond the identification of risks and opportunities for the realization of women’s rights, the event aims to: 

  • Showcase how renewable energy policies can be used as key enablers of gender equality and climate action, 
  • Specify policy interventions and recommendations that would enable the voices of women to be heard and influence decision-making processes related to the energy transition, and 
  • Engage with international human rights bodies and mechanisms to inform their work as it relates to climate change and just transitions to low carbon economies. 

By creating a space to share case studies and women’s testimonies, the event seeked to invite reflection on concrete action that can be taken to develop effective mechanisms that centre women’s knowledge and experiences and ultimately secure a gender-just transition to renewable energy.

Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung
Geneva Office

6 bis, Chemin du Point-du-Jour
1202 Geneva
Switzerland

+41 (0)22 733 34 50
+41 (0)22 733 35 45

info(at)fes-geneva.org
geneva.fes.de

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